Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

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Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  nero_design on Fri May 05, 2017 5:04 am



On this day, May 5, 1865 - the famous Australian Bushranger Ben Hall was betrayed by a friend and murdered after surrendering to police at Billabong Creek. Ben Hall, unlike his associates, never killed a man during his career as a Bushranger.

The police claimed that they were acting under the protection of the Felons Apprehension Act 1865 which allowed any bushranger who had been specifically named under the terms of the Act to be shot and killed by any person at any time without warning. At the time of Hall's death, the Act had not come into force, resulting in considerable controversy over the legality of his killing.

Hall was quite a legend in his day.  He robbed over 65 people on one day alone on on the Sydney/Melbourne road on November 15, 1864 at Jugiong.

In early 1865, the authorities finally determined on radical legislation to bring an end to the careers of Ben Hall, John Gilbert and John Dunn. The Felons Apprehension Act was pushed through the Parliament of New South Wales for the specific purpose of declaring Hall and his comrades outlaws, meaning that they would be "outside the law" and could be killed by anyone at any time without warning.

Hall was killed on the property of his "friend": 'Goobang Mick' Coneley - in the district of Goobang Creek near Forbes, NSW. At dawn on 5 May, 1856, he was ambushed by eight well-armed policemen. He was shot dead as he emerged from his campsite and ran to reach his horses. He had surrendered when shot.  And was unarmed. His body was completely riddled with gunshot wounds when examined by the commissioner. The Felons Apprehension Act was passed 5 days later on May 10. His funeral was 'rather numerously attended' ...for his reckless courage, courtesy to women, humor and hatred of informers had won him a sympathy not shared by his more bloodthirsty colleagues.




Ben Hall's and his gang committed over 100 robberies at the time, including a Gold Escort which was coming from the Upper Turon region as it passed near Sunny Corner.  A nearby creek was used as a getaway route and it has since been named 'Bushranger's Creek'.  He is said to have burned down the house of an inkeeper at the Ironbark diggings in NSW (now called Stuart Town).  On one robbery on June 15, 1862 - Hall robbed the Gold Escort coming from Eugowra (NSW) under the leadership of Bushranger Frank Gardiner (Ben Hall's sister was Gardiner's mistress) as a gang of 8 men. They relived the coach of banknotes and over 2700 troy ounces of gold - worth more than 14,000 pounds at the time. [over $13M today].  Treasure hunters still visit the area and it is even rumored that two Americans who were thought to be Gardiner's sons visited the Wheogo Station near the Weddins in 1912 claiming to be miners. Hall ranged up and down the East Coast of NSW with a lot of time between the districts of Nundle, Bathurst (he was born in nearby Maitland) and Collector (near the modern ACT).  

Ben Hall's two remaining partners in crime were eventually caught within a week of Hall's death. Johnny Gilbert was shot dead by the police at the age of 23 near Binalong, New South Wales on 13 May 1865. John Dunn was 19 years old when he was hanged in Darlinghurst Gaol. He was buried in the former Devonshire Street Cemetery in Sydney.  

Ben Hall died just 4 days shy of what would have been his 28th birthday.  He is considered today to have been the most efficient of the Bushranger leaders. His men were extremely well armed and superbly mounted... often on stolen race horses.

*The locally produced movie "The Legend of Ben Hall" [2016] should be out now on BluRay and DVD (it's already out overseas).
(I have no affiliation with the production and mention it simply in relation to one of the images posted here.).

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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  adrian ss on Fri May 05, 2017 8:02 am

Cannot think of anything good to say about Ben and his thug mates other than to say that these people and others like them should be forgotten, not remembered.

On the other hand there is an old saying that goes: "Those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it".
     I don't recall who said that but it goes back to biblical days.


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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  onthehunt on Fri May 05, 2017 8:23 am

Yeah, I don't know why we 'celebrate' bush rangers in this country. They terrorised and stole from desperate people. They're no better than the thieves of today. Although I do like reading about the history. Thanks for the post.

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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  adrian ss on Fri May 05, 2017 8:58 am

I guess history reminds us of how we got to be what we are today. It also hammers home the fact that we are very far from perfect and a very violent and savage species.
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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  nero_design on Fri May 05, 2017 1:36 pm

adrian ss wrote:Cannot think of anything good to say about Ben and his thug mates other than to say that these people and others like them should be forgotten, not remembered.

That's a simplistic way of seeing the past.  Remember that today, people have romanticized the subjects of Pirates - with Disney now making ungodly profits about characters who were better known in their day for absolute savagery and rape and murder. My mother remarried when I was very young, requiring her first marriage to be annulled by the Vatican back then.  She remarried a man (my Father to this day) who was from the Kelly family and hails from the same town at the Kelly Gang... which even today results in occasional needling from relatives.  One of my few memories of my grandfather was that he would sit in the outhouse all night with a shotgun waiting for a certain thief to return in the night who had stolen from his home previously.  I have no idea if they're related to the Kellys of Australian folk-law but I'm not related by blood there... and Kelly was a fairly common name at the time.

It's easy to see some of our colorful criminal history of yesterday as a form of savagery but not all bushrangers were thugs. Ben Hall and even the Kelly Gang were liked by the members of the general public and became outlaws at a time when the Irish were loathed by the British.  Before 1813, the entire colony used Rum as its main currency.  Drunkenness and assaults from intoxicated members of the NSW Corps resulted in a great deal of savage oppression here in the Colony.  The Rum Rebellion and arrest of Captain Bligh in Parramatta's Governor's House were the result of Bligh (the same Captain Bligh of the 'Mutiny On the Bounty' fame) blocking the importation of "illegal" stills by officer John Macarthur.

REBELLION:

The infamous Irish Convict Rebellion of 1804 [near where I live] resulted in 233 convicts absconding from their workfarms and joining forces with an intent to march upon the Governor at Parramatta and to steal a ship from Botany to take them back to Ireland.  "Liberty or Death" was their catch-cry... The same words uttered by the rioting Gold Diggers at the Eureka Stockade.  Convicts stole rum and guns and spread these around to generate support.  During the initial moments of the rebellion, the courier sent to draw support from convicts in Windsor and Parramatta defected from the movement and notified the commandant at Parramatta - who enabled defensive measures to be undertaken and the Governor to be alerted. The convicts were intercepted as they advanced towards Parramatta by in a battle known locally as The Castle Hill Convict Rebellion - at a location called Vinegar Hill (aka The Battle At Vinegar Hill). It was a rather short but brutal skirmish that took place between the British Redcoats and the convicts... who had managed to obtain over a third of the colony's armaments.  Nine of the Ringleaders were executed. Of the four leading men accused or starting the insurrection in 1804, 2 were hung from a gibbet in Executioner's Green (now renamed Prince Alfred Park in Parramatta, where the Miner's Den store conducts its Demo Days events today).


The Battle of Vinegar Hill

Their move had been informed from the intelligence gathered a year previous when 12 convicts de-camped from Castle Hill scouring the surrounding districts seeking out friends and sympathizers. On capture each and every one had the same story – they were heading to China by crossing over the Blue Mountains

The first convict bushrangers were active from 1790 to the 1860s.  The outlawed bushrangers of the 1860s and 1870s were able to be shot on sight due to the acts passed after Ben Hall's gang irritated the local constabulary.  The Hall gang were certainly well liked and they had a penchant for riding into town, buying everyone drinks and paying for food... before riding off again.  They were also known to be respectful to the women they encountered.

Robbing the Gold Escort was not necessarily an action against the miners... because they were never legally permitted to own the gold itself in the first place.  They had a right to dig for it, which they paid for with a digger's License.  Gold was known at the time as "The Queen's Metal" - which is why it's still a crime to pick it up in some states of Australia today without this document in your pocket, known still as a "Miner's Right".  Those caught digging gold without a license were often sentenced to a week or even a "month on the logs"... which meant they were chained to a massive fallen tree...and had to pick up the tree in order to move from one location to another.  They slept beside it in the sun and rain and were forced to cut roads and repair bridges etc.  Flogging the flesh off a man's back and down to the bone was not only commonplace, but it resulted in turning many former convicts into highwaymen and robbers.  Most has surprisingly short lives... with the exception of perhaps Martin Cash (who did not realize he was branding stolen cattle at the time) and the notorious Frank Gardiner... who was exiled to the Americas and whos American historical records were later destroyed in the San Fransisco Earthquake/Fires in 1906.

CAPTAIN THUNDERBOLT:
Frederick Wordsworth Ward - better known by the self-styled pseudonym of "Captain Thunderbolt", was an Australian bushranger renowned for escaping from Cockatoo Island, and also for his reputation as the "gentleman bushranger" and his lengthy survival, being the longest roaming bushranger in Australian history. For over six-and-a-half years, Ward robbed mailmen, travellers, inns, stores and stations across much of northern New South Wales - from the Hunter Region north to Queensland and from Tamworth nearly as far west as Bourke.

On 25 May 1870, after robbing travelers near the Big Rock, Ward was shot and killed by Constable Alexander Binney Walker at Kentucky Creek near Uralla.  He was allegedly drunk at the time, having received his last few drinks from a bartender with the influence of his revolver.  He had ignored the advice to flee.


The Death of Captain Thunderbolt.


Below are some various internet extracts mixed with personal observations:

The first bushrangers, 1790s–1820s
The first bushranger was John Caesar (alias Black Caesar), a former West Indian Negro slave and petty thief. Black Caesar escaped into the bush in 1790 with a musket where he later joined five or six other escaped convicts. This was the first of many attempts by Black Caesar, who survived by hunting and fishing in the bush as well as receiving food and musket shot provided by sympathetic settlers. Black Caesar's repeated escapes caused Governor John Hunter to offer a reward of five gallons of rum, which eventually resulted in him being captured and shot.

Convicts who bolted to the bush were also often helped by settlers or farmers sympathetic to their plight. Among the farmers were many ex-convicts who had served their terms and been granted a ticket-of-leave.

Wrongful arrests and improper practices by local police also played a part in driving men to bushranging. It could be said that these men had nothing at all to lose, even if being outlawed meant living in constant fear and desperation.

1825–1830s
One of the most famous bushrangers was 'Bold' Jack Donohoe, known as the 'Wild Colonial Boy'.

Soon after being transported to Botany Bay from Dublin in 1825, Jack Donohoe took up with two other Irish convicts, robbing bullock drays on the Windsor Road, west of Sydney. Donohoe escaped his hanging after he broke free from the court. Donohoe and a new gang of Irish and English escaped convicts ranged across the Liverpool, Parramatta and Windsor districts, eventually extending as far as Bathurst in the west, Yass to the south and the Hunter River to the north. Donohoe's gang robbed in the 'Robin Hood' style, taking from the rich and fencing their booty through the poor settlers in the district. Once, upon recognising the explorer Charles Sturt, when robbing his farmhouse, they returned all his goods.

Donohoe endeared himself to ex-convicts and sympathetic settlers. Newspaper reports between 1827 and 1830 noted Donohoe and his gang as 'remarkably clean' bushmen, dressed in a raffish style. 'Bold' Jack was described as fitted out in 'black hat, superfine blue cloth coat lined with silk... plaited shirt... laced boots'. When he was eventually shot and captured on 1 September 1830, Donohoe was noted as being 'five feet four in height, brown freckled complexion, flaxen hair and blue eyes'. On seeing the troopers, Donohoe was reported to have thrown his hat in the air and said 'Come on... we're ready'.

'Bold' Jack Donohoe had several ballads penned to commemorate his exploits in NSW, and even several versions of the most famous bushranging ballad of them all – The Wild Colonial Boy. This song became Australia's first unofficial anthem and the anthem of the 19th century. This song was sung over and over again by generations of Australians until it was eventually banned for its 'seditious sentiment'. However, it would not die, and the name was changed to Jack Doolan, or Jim Doolan or John Dowling, and then the lyrics changed so that the real events were hardly recognised – becoming part of Australian folklore. Eventually the authorities had to give up in banning it being sung.

The ethos of the song is captured in the line: 'I'll fight but not surrender', cried the Wild Colonial Boy.

It is known that the Wild Colonial Boy was sung heartily in the Glenrowan Hotel, the night before Ned Kelly was captured in 1880 and later by striking shearers in Queensland during the strikes of the 1890s.

So come away me hearties
We'll roam the mountains high
Together we will plunder
And together we will die.
We'll scour along the valleys
And we'll gallop o'er the plains
And scorn to live in slavery,
Bound down by iron chains.

[The Wild Colonial Boy]

The gold diggings and Black Douglas, 1850s–1860s
George Lacy (1816-1878), Capture of bushrangers at night by gold police, c. 1852.

After gold was discovered in 1851, first in Bathurst, NSW and then in the central Highlands of Victoria, bushrangers would hold up travellers and ask whether they were 'going up' or 'coming down'. It was common on the Bendigo and Ballarat for bushrangers to take into the bush anyone who was 'coming down', tie them to a tree and remove their gold receipts and cheques. The bushrangers then continued on down to Melbourne to cash the cheques and take possession of the gold.

In 1852, black trackers were brought in as native troops to tackle this practice of bushranging, as well as policing the gold diggings and escorting gold to Melbourne. Although they were very effective and popular they were disbanded in 1853. Black Douglas was a notorious 'Mulatto Indian' who ran a bushranging operation between Melbourne and Bendigo. Hundreds of diggers made their way up this road daily. One traveller, recorded seeing 'sixteen poor fellows fastened to a log' by that 'notorious robber Black Douglas'.

Black Douglas's headquarters were three miles from the Alma goldfield near Maryborough, and his gang's method was to rob the diggers' empty tents during the day and the shops at night. Black Douglas and his gang were captured when the diggers, fed up with the thieving, surrounded their tents and burnt them to the ground. Douglas was overpowered only after he was wounded. He was carted to Maryborough with an escort of more than 200 miners

'Mad Dan' Morgan, 1855–1865
Daniel Morgan brought discredit to the popular 'currency heroes' by his mixture of violence, abuse and seemingly meaningless murders. Morgan claimed his innocence at his first conviction in 1854, at the diggings near Castlemaine, which he said was 'framed' by a squatter. During his time at Pentridge Prison, he developed a violent dislike for police. Upon his release, he began a campaign against society at large and the police in particular.

Morgan once took issue with an overseer's wife when the man was away on business, demanding money from her as he forced her against a blazing fire until she suffered severe burns to her legs. Morgan also tried to burn squatter Isaac Vincent by setting fire to his woolshed after he had tied Vincent to a nearby fence. After Morgan bailed up coaches, he would stampede the horses – sending them and their drivers to destruction.

Eventually he was shot and captured in 1865 after being outwitted by a nursemaid and station hand at Peelhelba Station near Wangaratta, owned by the McPhersons.




NED KELLY and The Kelly Gang:
Even before his execution, Kelly had become a legendary figure in Australia. Historian Geoffrey Serle called Kelly and his gang "the last expression of the lawless frontier in what was becoming a highly organised and educated society, the last protest of the mighty bush now tethered with iron rails to Melbourne and the world." Despite the passage of more than a century, he remains a cultural icon, inspiring countless works in the arts, and is the subject of more biographies than any other Australian. Kelly continues to cause division in his homeland: some celebrate him as Australia's equivalent of Robin Hood, while others regard him as a murderous villain undeserving of his folk hero status. Journalist Martin Flanagan wrote: "What makes Ned a legend is not that everyone sees him the same—it's that everyone sees him. Like a bushfire on the horizon casting its red glow into the night.

Australian outlaw Ned Kelly (1855–1880) was leader of the Kelly gang, notorious for robberies and police shootings in the 19th century. Born June, 1855, Australian Ned Kelly shot a policeman who was trying to arrest his brother in 1877. The two fled into the bush, and formed the Kelly gang with two other men. The gang became notorious for their daring crimes, even taking over an entire township before being nabbed by police and hanged afterwards.

It's interesting to consider that the Kelly Gang had four sets of armor made.  I once heard that they each contacted a different blacksmith to have the armor made so as not to arouse suspicion.  Unlike the events laid out in the recent Heath Ledger movie, only Ned was able to don his armor before the infamous shootout at the Glenrowan Hotel on Sunday, June 27, 1880.

He was convicted of the willful murder of Constable Lonigan and was sentenced to death by hanging by Justice Barry. Several unusual exchanges between Kelly and the judge included the judge's customary words "May God have mercy on your soul", to which Kelly replied "I will go a little further than that, and say I will see you there where I go." At Kelly's request, his picture was taken and he was granted farewell interviews with family members. His mother's last words to him were reported to be "Mind you die like a Kelly."  He died November 11, 1880.  




Although the exact number is unknown, it is alleged that a petition for a commutation of sentence attracted over 30,000 signatures.  His last words as recorded by reporters at the prison were allegedly: "Such is Life".  It may be worth remembering that the police opened fire on the Glenrowan hotel even when they knew it will filled with innocent people. Under the cover of a final volley of police fire, Senior Constable Charles Johnson placed a bundle of burning straw at the hotel's West side.  As the fire consumed the building, three children were shot by police - even as they attempted to flee the flames.

The body of Joe Byrne (Ned's friend and gang member) was strung up in Benalla as a curiosity.  His body was used for souvenir photographs (see image).  It was later buried in an unknown location by police in a show of contempt towards the friends of the deceased. Joe was unique in his day - he had learned to speak Cantonese by the Chinese Gold Prospectors.   They also taught him how to smoke opium.

A favorite expression of Ned Kelly's was: 'I will let them see what one native [native-born Australian] can do.'
- Constables McIntyre

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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  MickCov on Fri May 05, 2017 9:06 pm

After Halls death he was paraded through the streets of Forbes to dissuade anyone who might think to go down a similar path. Regardless of what you might think of his crimes,he and Kelly ect will forever be part of our folk law

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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  slimpickens on Fri May 05, 2017 9:50 pm

"Hall was killed on the property of his "friend": 'Goobang Mick' Coneley - in the district of Goobang Creek near Forbes, NSW. At dawn on 5 May, 1856, he was ambushed by eight well-armed policemen. He was shot dead as he emerged from his campsite and ran to reach his horses. He had surrendered when shot.  And was unarmed."

Lines and quotes like these makes you question the whole history we've been fed on the gentlemanly behaviour of these common parasitical lazy arsed thieves.

"He had surrendered when shot." Says who? I don't think the police would own up to it.

" And was unarmed." Again says who?  The police? Why would they admit to such an essentially cowardly act?

Was Gooban Mick Coneley brought along at dawn to witness the "execution? I don't think the police would want any witness to their policing methods.

I think the only goodwill shown to these violent thugs was because of their "Irishness" against a violent drunken British government force.


It would be quite easy to shout everyone a drink if you've stolen the money/ gold off some hard working honest digger at no cost to you. Australian Folk history- bunkem.

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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  adrian ss on Sat May 06, 2017 9:08 am

Have to agree Slim.
Ask the people and families that these lazy arsed  psychopaths  robbed, ambushed, injured and terrorised, what they thought of them at the time. I doubt that there would be many nice patriotic thoughts.

Those hoods were no different to the thugs of today with their cowardly hit and run tactics who bash people in the streets, break into houses and shops and rob families of their hard earned possessions, or steal cars and cause punch ups at the discos etc etc
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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  nero_design on Sat May 06, 2017 6:42 pm

slimpickens wrote:....lines and quotes like these makes you question the whole history we've been fed on the gentlemanly behaviour of these common parasitical lazy arsed thieves.

"He had surrendered when shot." Says who? I don't think the police would own up to it.

" And was unarmed." Again says who?  The police? Why would they admit to such an essentially cowardly act?

Was Gooban Mick Coneley brought along at dawn to witness the "execution? I don't think the police would want any witness to their policing methods.

I think the only goodwill shown to these violent thugs was because of their "Irishness" against a violent drunken British government force.
It would be quite easy to shout everyone a drink if you've stolen the money/ gold off some hard working honest digger at no cost to you. Australian Folk history- bunkem.

Yeah, I don't think I'd feel too kindly to have been robbed of valuables or gold by bushrangers myself.

Why would the police admit to it?  Well, they thought they were covered by the Felons Apprehension Act.... (the arresting officer had also repeatedly told his men NOT to shoot). But in Hall's case, although he was named in the Act, the final proclamation and signature of the Governor did not occur until 10 May 1865; Hall was killed on 5 May, hence was not an outlaw as defined by this Act at the time at which he was killed.  This made his killing "unlawful" by legal definition.


The police who hunted and killed Ben Hall had removed their uniforms and were all dressed in plain clothes at the time.  They had also removed their boots to avoid detection.


He was shot within sight of Mick's cabin because Ben Hall had elected to make camp just beyond the treeline to disguise his position.  Mick had invited Hall in for dinner the night before but Hall didn't trust him due to the bounty on his head. Hall and his accomplices had previously distrusted Mick and suspected him of passing on tips to the police. Hall was waiting for his two partners to return - as they were on their way to Queensland where they figured they could stay ahead of the law.  Ben Hall's priest later came forward to say Hall had promised to give himself up within a few weeks because he had killed nobody and was worried of being labelled an outlaw due to the company he was keeping. When the 8 police attacked Ben Hall, they were dressed in plain-clothes, mostly rags. They carried massive firepower and arms that were not police issue. They wore no boots, only socks on their feet in the bitterly cold morning - to avoid detection. They had spent weeks eating possum and their beards were filthy and overgrown.  The police were also in violation of the law by carrying far more weapons than legally permitted.  They also shot at Hall without warning and from the cover of fallen trees.  It makes perfect sense that Ben would have run from these men, not knowing who they were.  The police report also made it clear, without directly stating so, that the police intended to kill Hall in his camp as he slept.  This was also what they had previously agreed to with the informant.


The shooting was witnessed by both Mary Ann Coneley and Mick Coneley... who stood on their porch and watched the entire event unfold. Hall was shot as he ran to the middle of the clearing after being cut off on three sides. He died clutching at one of the young saplings in the middle of the clearing.


He was certainly unarmed when killed.  His three revolvers fell from his belt at the first shot from the police when he stopped running... having already been shot in the back without warning as he was running. He was gut-shot by this next shot, although he already had his hands raised. As his guns fell, he cowed from the police and cried out to them "I'm unarmed!" as he reached a small sapling tree and turned to face the police one of his hands raised and the other hand gripping a sapling tree. He had already been shot in the back.  Not a single shot was fired at the police.  Hall had over thirty shots in him, several were made at his head at point blank range as they stood over him.  The police report was quite firm about him being unarmed at the time although one officer changed his statement when he discovered hall had not yet been named an outlaw.  Inspector Sandersonom himself was incredulous that Hall was gunned down unarmed because he had wanted Hall to stand trial and hang after a trial... which was intended to prove that the police could catch any bush-ranger.  Hall and his gang had previously ridden into various townships and partied with the locals before settling their bills and moving on again before the police arrived.  This had given the public the impression that the bushrangers could act with impunity and did not fear the police.  It was Sergeant Condell who wanted to kill Hall at the ambush.  Hall's "friend" Mick Coneley had previously instructed Constable Hipkiss / Sub-Inspector Davidson to "Kill Ben Hall at the first opportunity. He'll know it was me that done him..." because Hall had a knack for not only escaping police custody but he was known best for his vengeance on snitches. Ben Hall hated snitches and had previously burned down the homes, huts and residents of any and all who informed on him previously.



"As the Felons Apprehension Act was not then in force, Hall was thus entitled to all the normal rights of protection under the common law, meaning that he could not be shot during the course of an arrest unless he was directly threatening the police." -  [Dr Robert N Moles]

"Critically, in the Police Report dated 12th May (Appendix 2), Davidson amended his statement to claim that Hall had both “a bridle and a revolver in his hands” as he left the cover of the trees."  [This was in contrast to his original report and the reports by the other officers present.] "However, it would seem unlikely that a man would walk about holding a revolver while going to collect his horses when he thought that he was completely alone. Was this addition of Davidson’s influenced by the fact that by 12th May, he would have been made aware that the Felons Act was not in force when Hall was killed, hence the fact of whether or not Hall was directly threatening the police with a gun before they opened fire would be crucial to the police having the right to open fire as they did. Certainly Hall never fired his gun at the police."

application to re-examine the findings of the Magisterial Inquest dated 6th May 1865 concerning the death of Benjamin Hall:
http://netk.net.au/Outlaws/HallApplication.asp

Ben Hall – Magisterial Inquiry 6 May 1865:
http://netk.net.au/Outlaws/HallInquiry.asp

Police Report, Forbes, Saturday May 12th 1865:
http://netk.net.au/Outlaws/HallPolice.asp
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ben hall

Post  Tunnel Rat on Sat May 06, 2017 7:39 pm

Good post Nero........Rip BH.
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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  adrian ss on Sun May 07, 2017 8:22 am

A lot of detail there Nero? Where did that come from?....Sounds like it would make a good movie.  Laughing Rolling Eyes

Unfortunately I have no sympathy for any kind of criminal. They choose the lifestyle and  don't give a rats A*s* about anybody but them selves  and should in my opinion loose  all normal human rights once convicted. They deny innocent people/victims their rights when robbing them, assaulting them, destroying their property. They deserve likewise in return.
As for ben, Ned, Cptn Moonlight etc. They are where they belong.


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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  too much dirt on Mon May 08, 2017 10:41 am

Good write - up ,Nero.

I have never seen that photo of Joe Byrne ,before. I think he was the one who killed one of my relatives for being a police informant ( Aaron Sherritt ). My late relo`s used to shoot down any glorification of the Kelly gang ,but never gave up any other info on the reasons why . It`s fair to say that there would have been alot of tension between certain families ,friends and police after all was said and done in the Euroa and Glenrowan districts.

My great grandfather used to sit under wooden bridges and watch the Kelly`s ride over them as a kid ,but never mentioned a word.

It`s hard to imagine that was only 137 years` ago.


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Re: Anniversary of bushranger Ben Hall's Death today... May 5, 1865

Post  Redfin on Mon May 08, 2017 4:17 pm

adrian ss wrote:.Sounds like it would make a good movie.

.

Well that prompted me to have a gander.
A newish film was released in 2016

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3844876/

So downloaded it and will watch on the weekend.

The Trailer
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