NSW Highbanking

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NSW Highbanking

Post  keeif12 on Fri Mar 02, 2018 11:28 pm

Gday guys due to work commitments I've been out of action on the prospecting front for quite a while and its come to my understanding that highbankers are banned in NSW. Just wondering if there have been any updates on the legality of using a highbanker in NSW. I'm heading up that way soon was wondering what equipment to take. Has anyone spoken to any parks employees on the matter.

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Re: NSW Highbanking

Post  adrian ss on Sat Mar 03, 2018 7:41 am

This may be of help to you.

Sluicing: this method uses a metal, plastic or wood channel approximately 120cm long by
25 cm wide by 10 cms deep, with ‘riffles’ in the bottom. As gold bearing gravel and sand is
washed from the top of the sluice box, the gold settles in front of the riffles as the tailings go
out the end. Unlike detecting or panning, it is not a mobile activity – a sluice is usually put
into place in a good spot that has first been assessed by panning. River sluices can be
placed directly in waterways and fed with wash via buckets or shovels. There are other
sluices called ‘high-bankers’ or ‘banjos’ which, with the use of water pumped from streams,
can process wash-dirt away from the watercourse, or in the sand of the river bed itself. Use
of high-bankers ensures that there is no sediment released into creeks. However even
sluices that are used directly in waterways do not cause significant turbidity, which could
lead to a breach of the Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997.
Sluicing was commonly practiced in the 1800’s; where the devices were known by various
names such as ‘sluices’, ‘cradles’ or ‘long toms’. Concentrated sands and hopefully gold are
periodically recovered from the bottom of sluices and that material is then panned to recover
the gold.

So from this you can glean that a sluice deposits tailings into a waterway whereas a High Banker deposits the tailings onto/above  the river bank and away from the river. Hence the term High banker.

This is dated 2013 but I have not read any changes to this.

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/DBAssets/InquiryOther/Transcript/9378/Answers%20to%20supplementary%20QoNs%20-%20Mr%20Stephen%20Dangaar.pdf


Last edited by adrian ss on Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:57 am; edited 2 times in total
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Re: NSW Highbanking

Post  Tributer on Mon Mar 05, 2018 11:12 pm

Hi Keeif, according to the NSW Dept of Planning & Environment -resources and energy (PERE) (that's what there called this week) they still consider Highbanking as illegal under the ACT.
The NSW & ACT Prospectors and Fossickers Assoc (NAPFA) has been meeting and negotiating with PERE on the issue for some time. PERE staff have been stubborn and are not negotiating in good faith. NAPFA is now escalating the issue to a ministerial level again (new minister since last time) and will keep members informed of developments.
Tributer.

panning and sluices in the creek (no pumping water) are OK.
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Re: NSW Highbanking

Post  adrian ss on Tue Mar 06, 2018 8:59 am

A bit ironic really.
Sluices muddy the water whereas High bankers do not.
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Re: NSW Highbanking

Post  keeif12 on Wed Mar 07, 2018 12:08 am

cheers guys thanks for the replies

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